Jif peanut butter recall spreads to UK, Singapore

Peanut butter linked to a Salmonella outbreak in the United States has also been recalled in the United Kingdom and other countries.

In the United Kingdom, JDM Distributors recalled Jif Creamy Peanut Butter and Jif Extra Crunchy Peanut Butter 453-grams.

The creamy version has batch code 1343006 and best before Dec. 9, 2023 while the extra crunchy type has batch code 1296425 and best before date Oct. 23, 2023.

The Food Standards Agency in the UK advised anyone who had bought the  products not to eat them. Instead, they should be returned to the place of purchase for a refund. There have been no reports of related illnesses in the UK.

Recalls in other countries
Implicated products were also imported into Singapore. The Singapore Food Agency (SFA) told the importer, DKSH South East Asia Pte., to recall the affected batches and this is ongoing. Jif Omega-3 creamy peanut butter with lot codes 1274425 to 2140425 is involved.

In Hong Kong, potentially contaminated products were imported by Rainbow Asset. The firm has stopped sale and removed from shelves the affected products and initiated a voluntary recall.

It affects Jif Creamy Peanut Butter with dates of Nov. 12, 2023, Jan. 7 and 8, 2024; and Feb. 11, 2024. Crunchy peanut butter dated Nov. 16, 2023; Jan. 16 and Feb. 7, 2024 and Creamy Peanut Butter Portion Control Cup with dates Oct. 13, Nov. 5, and Nov. 21, 2022.

Information provided by J.M. Smucker Co. shows peanut butter was also distributed to Canada, Dominican Republic, Malaysia, Taiwan, Korea, Thailand, Honduras, Spain and Japan.

In the United States, J.M. Smucker has recalled multiple Jif brand peanut butter types. Other firms have recalled food made with the peanut butter.

Sixteen people have been infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Senftenberg from 12 states.

Illness dates are from Feb. 19 through May 2, 2022. Sick people range from less than one to 85 years old, with a median age of 51, and 73 percent are female. Two people have been hospitalized.

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